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General Info
Student Wellbeing

Contact:  (713) 348-3311 or wellbeing@rice.edu
Business Hours:  Monday - Friday (9:00 AM - 5:00 PM); closed weekends and University holidays
Located:  Gibbs Wellness Center (next door to the Recreation Center)

Counseling Center

Contact: 713-348-4867 (24 hours) Get emergency information
Business Hours: Monday - Friday (9:00am-5:00pm), closed weekends and University holidays.
Located: Rich Health Service Center (next to the Brown Masters House) and Gibbs Wellness Center

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Common Types of Drugs

Alcohol

Visit our page on alcohol for more information. 

Tobacco

 What: One of the most widely used drugs in the U.S., tobacco is a bunch of dry leaves that contain the drug nicotine, which acts as a stimulant or relaxant when ingested. It can be smoked, chewed, dipped, or snuffed.

Short term effects:

  • Increased blood pressure
  • Increased heart rate
  • At low levels, can act as a stimulant
  • At higher levels, can act as a relaxant or sedative
  • Oxygen imbalance

Long term effects:

  • Chronic lung disease
  •  Heart disease
  • Stroke
  • Many different types of cancer
  • Addiction

How addictive?  

  • Tobacco is very addictive. In addition to its effects as a stimulant/relaxant, nicotine activates the “reward” center of the brain, much in the same way that harder drugs like opium do. When this happens, smoking produces sensations of pleasure and euphoria.
  • Since tobacco has almost instant effects on your body, and you can take tons of “hits” a day, it becomes very easy to make it a habit. Once you start, it’s really difficult to quit.
  • There are plenty of ways to quit smoking, from nicotine replacement therapies to behavioural therapies. If you’re ready to quit, don’t hesitate to talk to someone.   

Hookah

 What: a water pipe used to smoke flavoured tobacco, hookahs are increasing trend in the U.S., especially amongst the youth set. After being heated with charcoal, the tobacco smoke passes through water before being inhaled from the mouthpiece. Smoking hookah is usually a social activity, in which people smoke from the same mouthpiece and pass it around the group. Like cigarettes, hookahs contain the addictive drug nicotine, which acts as a stimulant or relaxant. Many people think that hookahs are a “safer” alternative to smoking cigarettes; however, this is not true. In fact, smoking hookah is just if not more toxic than smoking cigarettes.  

Slang: narghile, argileh, shisha, hubble-bubble, goza

Short term effects:

  • Similar to tobacco, the nicotine in hookah acts as a stimulant or relaxant
  • Secondhand smoke for nonsmokers
  • Increased risk of communicable diseases, like hepatitis, tuberculosis, and meningitis
  • If you smoke hookah for an hour, you’ll absorb as much carbon monoxide as a pack of cigarettes
  • Absorption of tar, nicotine, and other heavy metals and toxins 

Long term effects:

  • Increased risk of many types of cancers, including lung and stomach cancers
  • Increased risk of erectile dysfunction
  • Heart disease
  • Clogged arteries
  • Lung problems

How addictive?  

There is an ongoing debate as to whether or not hookah is addictive. It contains nicotine, the same very addicting substance found in cigarettes, but there is not enough research to substantiate/prove how addicting it is. But that doesn’t mean that addiction is out of the question; just because we don’t know for sure doesn’t mean it’s not possible. Some of the factors that may influence hookah addiction include: type of tobacco, frequency and duration of smoking, your age, etc.  

Study Drugs: Ritalin/Adderall

What: Ritalin and Adderall (methylphenidate and amphetamines, respectively) are stimulants prescribed to patients with ADHD in pill form. They work by altering the brain’s supply of dopamine, which in ADHD patients has a calming effect that improves their ability to focus. People abuse Ritalin and Addreall for performance enhancement (to increase alertness, attention, focus) by swallowing them, or for the euphoric effects, usually achieved by injecting, snorting, or crushing them.

Slang: Skippy, the smart drug, Vitamin R, bennies, black beauties, roses, hearts, speed, uppers, kibbles and bits, pineapple 

Short term effects: 

  • Changes in blood pressure
  • Increased wakefulness
  • Psychotic episodes
  • Paranoia
  • Anxiety
  • Nervousness
  • Insomnia
  • Dizziness
  • Insomnia
  • Palpitations
  • Loss of appetite
  • Headaches
  • Nausea/vomiting
     

Long term effects: 

  • Digestive problems
  • Weight loss
  • Convulsions
  • Headaches
  • Irregular heartbeat, breathing
  • Withdrawal symptoms (fatigue, depression) when use is discontinued
  • Increased risk of stroke
  • Cardiovascular complications 

How addictive? 

If not used by prescription, Ritalin and Adderall can be very addictive. They act on the same neurotransmitters, dopamine, as cocaine, a highly addictive drug, so their effects in overstimulating the brain’s “reward” system are also similar. How addictive they are depends on many factors, including dosage and how they’re taken. For instance, snorting them unleashes their euphoric effects much more quickly into the bloodstream than swallowing them in pill form, increasing your likelihood of addiction.  

Steroids

 What: Anabolic steroids are synthetic substances resembling testosterone. Steroids work by binding to the hormone receptors on a cell and stimulating muscle growth. They can be prescribed for hormone deficiencies or weight gain by people with body-wasting diseases like cancer or AIDS. People who abuse steroids usually take them to build muscle mass or enhance their athletic performance.  They are ingested either orally or by injection, usually in cycles, though some users will take several different steroids at once to try to maximize their effects, which is called “stacking.” 

Slang: gym candy, pumpers, stackers, A’s, rhoids, juice  

Short term effects: 

  • Mania
  • Delusions
  • Aggressiveness
  • Mood swings
  • Paranoid jealousy 
  • Acne
  • Oily hair and skin
  • Cysts
  • Fluid retention
  • Jaundice  

 Long term effects:  

  • Premature balding 
  • Heart attacks 
  • Decreases in “good “cholesterol 
  • For men—shrinking of the testicles, reduced sperm count, infertility, baldness, development of breasts, increased risk for prostate cancer 
  • For women—development of masculine characteristics, such as excessive hair growth, menstrual irregularities, deepened voice  

Withdrawal symptoms – including fatigue, restlessness, loss of appetite, insomnia, reduced sex drive, steroid cravings, and depression, all of which may trigger a relapse of steroid abuse 

Inhalants

 What: any of a number of common industrial or household substances whose chemical vapors give you a rapid “high” when inhaled. Inhalants work by displacing oxygen in the lungs with mind-altering chemicals, inducing effects similar to alcohol intoxication, such as lightheadedness, euphoria, and lack of coordination. They’re most often abused by young people because they’re easily accessible and inexpensive.   

There are three main types of inhalants: 

Solvents – paint thinners, gasoline, glues, markers 

Gases – butane, propane, aerosol propellants, nitrous oxide (laughing gas) 

Nitrites - cyclohexyl, butyl, and amyl nitrites 

Slang: laughing gas, poppers, snappers, whippets
Short Term Effects:
  

  •  Loss of inhibition 
  • Headache 
  • Nausea or vomiting 
  •  Loss of motor coordination 
  • Wheezing 
  • Unconsciousness 
  • Slurred speech 
  • Excessive secretions from the nose 
  • Watery eyes 
  • Danger of suffocation  
  • Danger of cardiac arrest 

Long Term Effects:  

  •  Muscle weakness/spasms
  • Hearing loss 
  • Brain damage
  • Damage to cardiovascular and nervous systems
  • Damage to vital organs, including lungs, liver, and kidneys
  • Sudden death
  • Depression
  • Impaired coordination and movement 
  • Memory problems
  • Learning impairment     

How Addictive?  

Although not very commonly found to be addictive, studies have found that repeated use can cause you to become addicted.   

Heroin

 What: the most abused opiate in the U.S., heroin is a white, brown, or black and sticky substance that can be injected, snorted, or smoked. When ingested, heroin converts to morphine and binds to opoid receptors in the brain and spinal cord, which control such important functions as pain perception, pleasure perception, breathing, and blood pressure. When this happens, heroin induces sensations of euphoria, drowsiness, and heaviness of the extremities (reword that) 

Heroin use is associated with serious health problems, and is highly addictive.   

Slang: Smack, H, ska, junk, dope, skag, brown sugar 

Short term effects:  

  •  Euphoria
  • Drowsiness
  • Dizziniess
  • Confusion
  • Nausea 
  • Sedation
  • Feeling of heaviness in the body
  • Slowed breathing  

Long term effects: 

  •  Fatal overdose
  • Collapsed veins
  • Infection of heart lining and valves
  • Liver/kidney disease
  • Pneumonia, other pulmonary complications 
  • Permanent damage to vital organs such as the lungs and brain
  • Severe withdrawal symptoms (such as insomnia, vomiting, diarrhea, muscle and bone pain)
  • Addiction   

How addictive?  

Heroin has a high risk of addiction. When used regularly, the user’s tolerance increases, and more is needed to achieve the same effects. Regular heroin users may become physiologically and psychologically dependent on it.   

Prescription Drugs

 Painkillers (i.e., oxycontin, Vicodin), oxycodone (e.g., OxyContin—an oral, controlled-release form of the drug), morphine, fentanyl, codeine, and related medications, Lortab, Oxycontin, Percocet, Vicodin, and Demerol) 

What: as their name suggests, this variety of opiate drugs is prescribed for pain relief. They work by binding to opoid receptors in the brain and spinal cord, altering the body’s perceptions of pain and pleasure. People usually abuse them to induce sensations of euphoria, which can be more rapid depending on the method of ingestion. They can be swallowed injected, supposited, chewed, crushed, or snorted.  

Slang (for various types): oxy 80s, oxycotton, oxycet, hillbilly heroin, percs, pain killer, juice, dillies

Short term: 

  •  Drowsiness 
  • Pain relief 
  • Euphoria
  • Depress breathing  
  • Life-threatening respiratory depression if taken in combination with other substances, such as alcohol, antihistamines, barbiturates, or benzos.  

Long term: 

  •  Respiratory depression and arrest 
  • Nausea
  • Confusion 
  • Constipation 
  •  Sedation
  •  Unconsciousness 
  • Severe withdrawal symptoms, including vomiting, insomnia, and muscle and bone pain.  
  •  Coma 
  • Death from overdose  
  • Addiction   

How addictive?  

When taken as prescribed, opoids rarely cause addiction. However, if regularly abused, users may develop an increased tolerance or become addicted to them.    

CNS depressants

CNS depressants 

What: a group of medications used to treat anxiety and sleep disorders. They work by attaching to a neurotransmitter, GABA (gamma-aminobutyric acid) that slows down normal brain activity. This usually makes the user feel drowsy or calmer. They usually come in pill form and are swallowed.   

Types of CNS depressants: 

1) Barbiturates ( such as (Mebaral) and (Nembutal), are used as preanesthetics, promoting sleep. 

Slang: barbs, reds, red birds, phennies, tooies, yellows, yellow jacket 

2) Tranquilizers (benzodiazepines, aka benzos, such as Valium, Xanax, and Librium) – used to treat anxiety, panic attacks, short-term relief for sleep disorders due to high risk of addiction 

Slang: candy, downers, sleeping pills, tranks 

3) Newer sleep medications (such as such as zolpidem (Ambien), zaleplon (Sonata), and eszopiclone (Lunesta), - more commonly used to treat sleep disorders due to lower risk of addiction.  

Short term effects: 

  •  Reduced pain and anxiety
  •  Feeling of well-being 
  • Lowered inhibitions 
  • Slowed pulse and breathing 
  • Lowered blood pressure 
  • Poor concentration 
  • Can cause drowsiness or even death if combined with any medication or substance that causes drowsiness (i.e. allergy meds, alcohol, etc.)   

Long term effects:  

  •  Confusion 
  • Fatigue 
  • Impaired coordination 
  • Memory 
  • Judgment 
  • Respiratory depression and arrest 
  • Addiction 
  • Severe withdrawal symptoms, including seizures 
  • Death    

How addictive?  

CNS depressants can be very addictive. Tolerance increases quickly with repeated, regular use, and as a result you may become physiologically or psychologically dependent on their effects. They should only be used as prescribed.   

Cocaine

 What: a strong central nervous system stimulant that gives a powerful, short-lived “high” when used. Cocaine blocks the brain from recycling its supply of dopamine, neurotransmitters linked to the brain’s reward circuit. This suppression leads to a dopamine overstimulation, resulting in feelings of euphoria, as well as increased energy and alertness, for the user. The intensity and duration of the high depends on how it’s taken. Injecting or smoking it produces a quicker, stronger high than snorting it, but it doesn’t last as long, maybe no longer than 5 to 10 minutes. That’s why some cocaine users may go on a “binge,” snorting increasingly higher doses of cocaine in a short amount of time.  

Cocaine is associated with severe short and long term health problems, and has a high rate of addiction.  

Slang: blow, bump, dust, candy, girl, coke, crack, flake, snow,  

Short term effects:  

  • Increased heart rate, blood pressure, and body temperature 
  • Increased energy 
  •  Feelings of exhilaration 
  • Increased mental alertness 
  • Tremors  
  • Dilated pupils 
  • Reduced appetite 
  • Irritability 
  • Anxiety/Panic 
  • Paranoia 
  • Depression 
  • Aggressiveness 
  •  Psychosis 
  • When combined with alcohol, risk of sudden death  

Long term effects:  

  • Weight loss 
  • Insomnia 
  • Cardiac or cardiovascular complications 
  • Stroke 
  • Seizures  
  • Addiction 
  • Nasal damage from snorting   

How addictive?  

Cocaine can be a powerfully addictive drug. Repeated use builds tolerance, and the user has to ingest increasing amounts to try to achieve the same high, a habit which can quickly lead to addiction. This is especially true because cocaine’s effects are associated with the reward circuit of the brain, meaning that the user may become physiologically and psychologically dependent on the “pleasurable” effects of cocaine as their brain chemistry is altered.   

The danger of cocaine addiction for first-time users is still possible: in fact, even trying cocaine once does not predict or control how addicted you could be.  

Hallucinogens

LSD 

What: one of the most potent hallucinogens, it’s made from lysergic acid, which is found in a fungus that grows on certain grains. It’s usually taken orally in tablet or capsule form, but it’s sometimes taken in liquid form. It disrupts levels of the neurotransmitter serontonin, which regulates such important functions as mood, behavior, muscle control, and sensory perception. Taking LSD induces hallucinations, distorted perceptions, and intense emotional swings. In some people, it can also cause flashbacks, which may impair social functioning, panic, and fear of insanity or death. These effects, known as “trips,” can last up to 12 hours. 

Slang: acid, blotter, cubes, microdot yellow sunshine, blue heaven

Short term effects: 

  • Altered states of perception and feeling
  • Hallucinations
  •  Nausea
  • Increased body temperature
  •  Heart rate
  •  Blood pressure
  •  Loss of appetite
  •  Sweating
  •  Sleeplessness
  •  Numbness
  • Dizziness
  •  Weakness
  •  Tremors
  • Impulsive behavior
  •  Rapid shifts in emotion 

Long term effects: 

  • Flashbacks
  • Increased tolerance
  • Hallucinogen Persisting Perception Disorder 

How addictive?
LSD is not considered an addictive drug, since most users are able to decrease or stop using it. However, regular or repeated can cause the user to develop a tolerance to it, so that they have to take increasingly high levels of it to achieve the same effects, which is incredibly dangerous and unpredictable. Research has found that LSD tolerance may also be associated with increased tolerance to other hallucinogens. 

Mushrooms


What: certain types of mushrooms they contain a chemical compound, psilocybin, that acts as a hallucinogen. Like LSD and PCP, mushrooms disrupt levels of the neurotransmitter serotonin, which regulates such important functions as as mood, behavior, muscle control, and sensory perception. Mushrooms are typically swallowed, and can be taken fresh or dried. Their effects begin to manifest within 20 minutes of taking them and last about 6 hours.

Slang: Magic mushrooms, purple passion, shrooms, little smoke

Short term effects: 

  • Altered states of perception and feeling
  •  Hallucinations
  •  Nausea
  • Nervousness
  • Paranoia
  • Panic
  • Psychosis

 Long term effects: 

  • Flashbacks
  •  Risk of psychiatric illness
  •  Impaired memory
  •  Tolerance 

How addictive? 

Mushrooms have not been shown to be addictive. However, tolerance builds quickly, and may lead to a physiological and/or psychological dependence on them. 

PCP

What: a “dissociative drug” usually in the form of white crystalline powder. It used to be used as an intravenous anesthetic, but the frequent dissociative side effects from patients prompted its discontinuation on the legal market. Like LSD, PCP can cause hallucinations, distorted perceptions, and intense emotional swings by disrupting levels of the neurotransmitter serontonin, which regulates such important functions as mood, muscle control, and sensory perception. It also interacts with a glutamate receptor in the brain that regulates pain perception, learning, and memory. It can be snorted, smoke, or taken orally. Depending on how it’s taken, its effects can last from 4 to 6 hours.

Slang: angel dust, boat, hog, love boat, peace pill

Short term effects: 

  • Feelings of being separate from one’s body and environment
  •  Impaired motor function
  • Analgesia
  • Psychosis
  •  Aggression
  •  Violence
  •  Slurred speech
  •  Loss of coordination
  •  Hallucinations

Long term effects: 

  • Anxiety
  • Tremors
  •  Numbness
  •  Memory loss
  •  Nausea  

How addictive?  

PCP can be addictive. With repeated or regular use, users can develop an addiction that leads them to crave it despite its negative health consequences. 

Ketamine

What: a dissociative anesthetic usually used in veterinary practice. It’s called “dissociative” because it can distort perceptions and cause you to feel detached from your body and environment. It works similarly to that of the drug PCP, by interacting with a glutamate receptor, induces such effects as impaired memory and motor ability. At higher doses, it can induce more dangerous effects, including hallucinations, delirium, or even death. It’s usually snorted or injected into the muscles.

Slang: cat Valium, K, Special K, vitamin K 

Short term effects: 

  • Feeling like you’re separated from you body and environment
  •  Impaired motor function
  • Impaired memory
  • High blood pressure
  • At high doses, hallucinations and amnesia
  • Delirium, amnesia at really high doses
  • Potentially fatal respiratory problems in high doses 

Long term effects: 

  • Anxiety
  • Tremors
  • Numbness
  •  Memory loss
  •  Nausea
  • Severe withdrawal symptoms
  • Addiction 

How addictive? 

Ketamine can be addictive. Reports have shown addiction behaviours in ketamine users similar to that seen in some cocaine or amphetamine addicts. Regular, and/or repeated use of ketamine can build tolerance and potential dependence on the drug.

Rophynol

What: a potent CNS depressant notoriously known as the “date rape drug,” it’s available in pill or other odorless, colorless, and tasteless forms, and is frequently combined with alcohol and other drinks. Like other CNS depressants, it attaches to the GABA neurotransmitters in the brain, slowing down normal brain function to induce sedative effects. Not only is it cited as a drug used in many sexual assaults, but some people use it to counteract the effects of other stimulants.

Slang: forget-me pill, Mexican Valium, R2, roach, Roche, roofies, roofinol, rope, rophies

Short term effects: 

  • Sedation
  •  Muscle relaxation
  •  Confusion
  •  Memory loss
  •  Dizziness
  •  Impaired coordination
  • Associated with increased risk of sexual assault
  • Possibly lethal when mixed with alcohol and/or other CNS depressants 

Long term effects: 

  • Coma
  • Death
  • Tolerance

How addictive?  

Rophynol can be very addictive. Tolerance increases quickly with repeated, regular use, and as a result you may become physiologically or psychologically dependent on their effects. 

Amphetamines (speed)

What: a stimulant drug sometimes prescribed for people with ADHD (attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder). Amphetamines increase levels of dopamine, a neurotransmitter associated with such important brain functions as pleasure, movement, and attention, which induces effects such as wakefulness, increased focus, and reduced fatigue. Usually taken in tablet form, they can be

swallowed, snorted, smoked, or injected. People abuse amphetamines to get high or for performance enhancement. If ingested in crushed form, it may also produce euphoric effects.

Slang: bennies, black beauties, crosses, hearts, LA turnaround, speed, truck drivers, uppers 

Short term effects: 

  • Increased heart rate
  • Blood pressure
  •  Body temperature
  • Feelings of exhilaration
  •  Increased energy
  •  Mental alertness
  • Tremors
  • Reduced appetite
  •  Irritability
  •  Anxiety
  • Panic
  • Paranoia
  • Violent behavior
  • Psychosis 

Long term effects: 

  • Weight loss
  • Insomnia
  • Cardiac/cardiovascular complications
  • Stroke
  • Seizures
  • Severe withdrawal symptoms (such as fatigue, depression, disturbed sleep patterns)
  • Addiction 

How addictive? 

If taken in a nonprescribed way, amphetamines can be very addictive. Their interactions with dopamine interfere with the brain’s “reward” circuit, so repeated and/or regular use can quickly build a tolerance, and possibly a physiological/psychological dependence, on achieving the same effects. These factors can quickly develop into an addiction. 

Ecstasy

What: a synthetic, psychoactive drug that’s usually taken orally in capsule or tablet form. Ecstasy intensifies the effects of serotonin, a neurotransmitter that regulates such important functions as mood, sexual activity, sleep, and sensitivity to pain. It also intensifies the effects of another neurotransmitter, norepinephrine. As a result, ecstasy induces effects of increased energy, euphoria, and distortions in time and tactile perception. Some people take it along with other illicit and legal drugs, such as marijuana or cocaine. 

Slang: Ecstasy, Adam, clarity, Eve, lover's speed, peace, uppers

Short term effects: 

  • Mild hallucinogenic effects
  •  Increased tactile sensitivity
  •  Empathic feelings
  •  Lowered inhibition
  •  Anxiety
  •  Chills
  •  Sweating
  •  Teeth clenching
  •  Muscle cramping
  • Hyperthermia at high doses, which can lead to organ failure or death
  • Exacerbating effects in people with heart disease or circulatory probs, which could result in other symptoms such as muscle tension, involuntary teeth clenching, nausea, blurred vision, faintness, and chills or sweating.
  • Screwed over by drug dealer
  • In combination with other drugs 

Long term effects: 

  • Sleep disturbances
  • Depression
  • Impaired memory
  • Hyperthermia
  • Anxiety
  • Addiction
  • Withdrawal symptoms (fatigue, loss of appetite, depressed feelings, and trouble concentrating.2 
  • Death

 How addictive? 

MDMA can be addictive. Repeated use of ecstasy increases the risk of tolerance and physiological and/or psychological dependence on it. In addition to the risk for addiction, MDMA carries other serious health risks, including the possibility of being mixed with other illegal drugs, such as ecstasy, which may make its ingestion neurotoxic. 

GHB

What: GHB (Xyrem) - a central nervous system (CNS) depressant prescribed for narcolepsy (a sleep disorder), its effects and use mirror that of Rophynol. GHB increases the neurotransmitter GABA (gamma-aminobutyric acid), which induces sedative effects. It’s usually taken orally, in either liquid or powder form. Also like Rophynol, it’s available in odorless, colorless, and tasteless forms frequently combined with alcohol and other beverages. At high doses, it can induce sleep, coma, or even death. Its use has also been  associated with sexual assault.  

 Slang: G, Georgia home boy, grievous bodily harm, liquid ecstasy, soap, scoop, goop, liquid X

Short term effects:

  • Drowsiness
  • Nausea
  • Headache
  • Disorientation
  • Loss of Coordintion
  • Memory Loss
  • Nausea, breathing difficulties if combined with other drugs like alcohol
  • At high doses, sleep
  • Use associated with poisonings, date rapes, overdoses 

Long term effects: 

  • Builds muscle (body builders use it for its anabolic effects)
  • Unconsciousness
  • Seizures
  • Coma
  • Severe withdrawal effects (such as insomnia anxiety, sweating)
  • Addiction
  • Death 

 How addictive?  

Like other CNS depressants, GHB can be very addictive. Tolerance increases quickly with repeated, regular use, and as a result you may become physiologically or psychologically dependent on their effects. 

Methamphetamine

What: a central nervous system stimulant, it’s usually found as a white, odorless, crystalline powder. It can be swallowed, snorted, injected, smoked, or dissolved in water or alcohol. It disrupts levels of the neurotransmitter dopamine, which is associated with the brain’s “reward” circuit, resulting in rapid euphoric effects.

Slang: meth, ice, crank, chalk, crystal, fire, glass, go fast, speed

Short term effects:

  • Increased heart rate
  • Increased blood pressure
  • Increased body temperature
  •  Metabolism
  •  feelings of exhilaration
  •  increased energy
  •  mental alertness
  •  tremors
  •  reduced appetite
  •  irritability
  • anxiety
  •  panic
  •  paranoia
  •  violent behavior
  •  psychosis
  • Increased risk of HIV, hepatitis

 Long term effects: 

  • Weight loss
  •  Insomnia
  •  Cardiac or cardiovascular complications
  •  Stroke
  •  Seizures
  • Addiction
  • Severe dental problems
  • Emotional and cognitive problems

 How addictive?  

Methamphetamine abuse has a high risk of addiction. Repeated and/or regular use of methamphetamine also significantly alters brain chemistry, impairing your cognitive and emotional abilities. 

References

"Drug Fact Sheets." Center for Disease Control. http://cdc.gov  

"Drug Abuse." NIDA for Teens. http://teens.drugabuse.gov/   

"Drug Abuse Info Facts." NIDA Infofacts. http://www.drugabuse.gov/infofacts/infofactsindex.html